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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Lignin enzymic and microbial degradation found in the catalog.

Lignin enzymic and microbial degradation

Lignin enzymic and microbial degradation

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Published by Institut national de la recherche agronomique in Paris .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lignin -- Biodegradation.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesDégradation de la lignine par voie enzymatique et microbienne.
    Statement[editor, Etienne Odier] = Dégradation de la lignine par voie enzymatique et microbienne : symposium international, Paris (France) 23-24 avril 1987 / [éditeur, Etienne Odier].
    SeriesLes Colloques de l"INRA,, no 40, Colloques de l"INRA ;, 40.
    ContributionsOdier, Etienne., Institut national de la recherche agronomique (France)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsMLCM 91/02460 (S)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination302 p. :
    Number of Pages302
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2114256M
    ISBN 102853409775
    LC Control Number88169099
    OCLC/WorldCa19336055

    The degradation of these complex molecules requires cooperative and synergistic enzymic interactions within the microbial community and, inevitably, bacterial diversity. In turn, the resultant nutrients released support a diverse range of organisms with different nutrient requirements (). The microbiological degradation of lignin is reviewed in chapt. 4 ( 4 fig., 2 graphs, 8 tables, 79 ref.) which includes sects. on lignin-degrading fungi and their enzymes and the chemistry of the enzymic degradation of lignin.

    e effects of biological pretreatment on the rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis), was evaluated after cultivation of white rot fungi Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, Trametes versicolor, and a mixed culture of C. subvermispora and T. versicolor. The analysis of chemical compositions indicated that C. subvermispora had greater selectivity for lignin degradation with the highest lignin and hemicellulose Cited by: Over the last ten years, the demand of biodegradable polymers has grown at an annual rate of 20–30%. However, the market share is about less than % of the total plastic production due to their lower performances, higher price and limited legislative attention in respect to the standard materials. The biodegradability as a functional added property is often not completely perceived from Cited by: 4.

    @article{osti_, title = {Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification}, author = {Pu, Yunqiao and Hu, Fan and Huang, Fang and Ragauskas, Arthur J.}, abstractNote = {Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Here, we developed an enzyme assay of manganese peroxidase (MnP) by capillary electrophoresis using an in-capillary reaction and applied it to a simultaneous assay of MnP and lignin peroxidase (LiP). The enzyme activity of MnP was determined from the peak area corresponding to Mn(III)–malonate produced by the plug–plug reaction between MnP and Mn(II) in a separation by: 5.


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Lignin enzymic and microbial degradation Download PDF EPUB FB2

Lignin enzymic and microbial degradation. Paris: Institut national de la recherche agronomique, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors /.

Biswas-Hawkes DA, Dodson PJ, Harvey PJ and Palmer JM () Ligninases from white-rot fungi. In: E Odier (ed) Lignin Enzymic and Microbial Degradation (pp Cited by: Sugiura J, Sakaino M, Kojima Y, Tsujioka K, Mutou Y, Shinohara Y, Koide K () Purification and properties of phenol oxidose produced by white rot fungi and molecular cloning of phenol oxidose gene, In: Int Sem lignin enzymic and microbial degradation, Int Symp Wood and Pulping Chem, Paris, pp – Vol.

2 Google ScholarCited by: Repr. from "Lignin enzymic and microbial degradation, Paris, avrilEd. INRA, (Les Colloques de l'INRA, no 40)." Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche. These results have changed the aims of biopulping from an Lignin enzymic and microbial degradation book on removing the bulk of lignin to an emphasis on a short-term process, lasting 2 weeks and yielding a low mass loss.

Data on these kinetics of fungal development and the degree of asepsis will help to scale-up the by:   Lignin degrading auxiliary enzymes are unable to degrade lignin on their own functions which need additional enzyme involvement for complete degradation (Janusz et al., ).

Lignin degrading auxiliary enzymes enables the process of lignin degradation through the sequential action of several proteins that may include oxidative H 2 O 2 (Janusz Author: Adarsh Kumar, Ram Chandra.

Schematic overview of the cellular and biochemical processes and some important physicochemical parameters involved in the microbial degradation of natural oils.

The ‘micelle’ represents the substrate in an aggregated state, i.e. in the form of an adsorbed monolayer, a micelle or an emulsion according to Verger ().

The substrate is also. The cellobiose-oxidizing enzymes CBQ and CbO as related to lignin and cellulose degradation — a review Paul Ander Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Products, P.O.

BoxS 07 Uppsala, SwedenCited by: Microbial degradation of the phytosterol side chain. Enzymic conversion of 3-oxoethylcholestenoic acid into 3-oxocholenoic acid and androstene-3,dione. Request PDF | OnAnnele Hatakka and others published Biodegradation of Lignin | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGateAuthor: Annele Hatakka.

Biodegradation of Lignin by White Rot Fungi Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Fungal Genetics and Biology 27() July with 3, Reads How we measure 'reads'. Westermark, K.-E. ErikssonCarbohydrate-dependent enzymic quinone reduction during lignin degradation Acta Chem. Scand. B, 28 (), pp.

Google ScholarCited by: Forest Products Laboratory One Gifford Pinchot Drive Madison, WI Phone: () Fax: () Email. Extracellular enzymes are the proximate agents of organic matter transformation in soils. Data on microbial distributions and diversity are accumulating rapidly, and advances in molecular biology are providing new tools that are applicable to extracellular enzyme studies.

In particular, proteomic approaches can be used to identify the extracellular enzymes that link genomic information with Cited by:   In: Odier E ed. Lignin Enzymic and Microbial Degradation.

Paris: INRA Publications. pp Higuchi T (). Biosynthesis of lignin. In: Higuchi T ed. Biosynthesis and Biodegradation of Wood Components. San Diego: Academic Press. pp Higuchi T (). Mechanisms of lignin degradation by lignin peroxidase and laccase of white-rot fungi. Lignin is the largest renewable resource of aromatics with the production of approximately million tons per year.

Due to its recalcitrance imposed by, e.g., various C–C and C–O intermolecular bonds of which the arylglycerol β-O-4 aryl ether bond, accounting for 45–60% of the total linkages, is the most abundant, lignin is still largely considered as a side product of by:   Bioremediation Approaches.

Microbial metabolism is regarded as the most important mechanism of pesticide degradation in soil [12, 13], and it constitutes the basis for all bioremediation and bioaugmentation ore, conditions that favor microbial growth and activity in soil, such as temperature, moisture, nutrient status, pH, and aeration, will also generally promote metabolic Cited by: An alternate approach to the conventional chemical processing of lignin, a potential renewable resource, is enzymic conversion.

Biodegradation of wood, a lignin-cellulose complex, is accomplished naturally by various enzymes of microbial origin. Extracellular lignases have been isolated from pure. Thus, while most microorganisms can assimilate simple monomers, degradation of polymers is specialized, and few organisms can degrade recalcitrant polymers like cellulose and lignin.

Each microbial species carries specific combinations of genes for extracellular enzymes and is adapted to degrade specific substrates. [12]. Soybean is one of the most cultivated crops in the world, with a global production of approximately million tons, generating about 18–20 million tons of hulls, the major by-product of soy industry.

The chemical composition of soybean hulls depends on the efficiency of the dehulling process, and so, the soybean hulls may contain variable amounts of cellulose (29–51%), hemicelluloses (10 Cited by: 5.

Intermediate Steps pf Microbial Lignin Degradation as Elucidated by13C NMR Spectroscopy of Specifically13C-Enriched DHP-Lignins Konrad Haider, Hartmut W. Kern, and Ludger Ernst Holzforschung,Vol Number 1, Page 23Cited by: By the late 17th and early 18th centuries, the digestion of meat by stomach secretions and the conversion of starch to sugars by plant extracts and saliva were known but the mechanisms by which these occurred had not been identified.

French chemist Anselme Payen was the first to discover an enzyme, diastase, in A few decades later, when studying the fermentation of sugar to alcohol by.Microbial degradation of lignin: how a bulky recalcitrant polymer is efficiently recycled in nature and how we can take advantage of this.

Microbial Biotechnology, vol. 2, no. 2, p.